Images of Protists

Images and movies contributed by our members.

Protist videos by George Sartiano

An extensive collection of videos about protists produced by George Sartiano, who may be contacted at sartiano@hotmail.com. The collection is housed on its own page.

The Protists of Singapore

Videos and images by Brandon Seah. Singapore is a highly urbanized island sited almost on the Equator, but still has some small patches of forest that support a surprising amount of biodiversity. Its plant and animal life have been amply documented, but not so the protists that thrive unseen. This webpage aims to bring the wonderful diversity of protist life into the foreground, showing that they are not just "pond scum" but beautiful organisms that often have interesting behaviors. Illustrated with both photomicrographs and videos.

http://sgprotist.wordpress.com/

Protists of the Plankton Image Gallery

Images by John Dolan. Marine protists (ciliates, dinoflagellates, radiolarians, etc.) found in the plankton with an emphasis on tintinnid ciliates.

http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/gallery/Aquaparadox

Videos of Marine Planktonic Protists

Videos by John Dolan. Short but high-res videos of Tintinnid ciliates and Ceratium dinoflagellates.

http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/LOV/aquaparadox/html/VideosPage.php

Dinoflagellate Feeding Strategies

Video and presentation development by Urban Tillmann. Contact him at urban.tillmann@awi.de with questions and comments.

This video collection demonstrates several feeding techniques used by predatory dinoflagellates.

Didinium's Squeeze Bulb Ingestion Technique

Video observation and text by Bruce J Russell

Watch the movie!

The Didinium/Paramecium relationship is a classic study in predator prey relations. Many students of protozoa have seen Didinium spear its prey using trichites, explosive threads that not only paralyze the prey, stopping its ciliary beat, but also secure it for engulfment. Didinium then expands its mouth and swallows the Paramecium. I had filmed this act several times without clearly showing how the actual engulfment of the prey (often larger than the predator) is achieved. Staining Paramecium with congo red allowed clear visualization of Didinium's "squeeze bulb" ingestion process. This observation is from The Biology of Protists DVD.

Gerda sp.

Video by Genoveva Esteban

Watch the movie!